Click here for an CycleVIN Motorcycle History Report on this 2001 Honda CBR929RR Erion Racing. Note that CycleVIN shows this bike was impounded in 2012. Additional photos are available here for your perusal.

Far from a bored-out version of its predecessor, the CBR929RR was an all-new model. In fact, the only pieces that were interchangeable from the outgoing model were the countershaft sprocket and clutch plates – everything else was completely novel. At the heart of the 929 was an all-new over square engine that made some major advancements over the first Fireblade. Thanks to a cleverly-designed high-flowing cylinder head and a bevy of trick lightweight internals, the 929 produced significantly more power than the 900 at higher RPM. The 929 also featured Honda’s PGM-FI and 40mm Keihin throttle bodies — with one injector per cylinder — developed with Honda specifically for the 929.

The package also included the firm’s HTEV (Honda Titanium Exhaust Valves), as well as a flapper valve in the airbox to bolster mid-range power. The liquid-cooled, four-stroke, DOHC, 929cc, four-cylinder engine put down 152 hp at 10,750 rpm and 76.1f t-lbs of torque at 9,000 rpm — a major jump over the first double-R. Admittedly, the Honda was a little down on power compared to the Yamaha, however, the RR more than made up for it in the corners. The 929 offered excellent handling, largely thanks to its new “pivot-less” frame design. Gone was the old perimeter structure, and in its place was a twin-spar aluminum unit which utilized the powertrain as a stressed member and mounting point for the swingarm and backbone. Because the swingarm pivot was positioned in the engine case, the swingarm – which like the frame was both lighter and more rigid than the outgoing model’s — was able to be stretched by 20mm, despite the wheelbase being 5mm shorter.

While the original 900RR featured a front-end designed to look like an inverted unit, the 929 featured an actual pair of upside-down forks; a 43mm HMAS (Honda Multi-Action System) set that was fully adjustable, just like the piggyback-reservoir-equipped monoshock. Stopping power came from dual 330mm discs pinched by four-pot Nissin calipers, and as Cycle World put it, they “refuse to fade”. Another major change on the 929 was its 17-inch front-wheel.

Similar to the 900RR, a major theme in the 929’s design was keeping weight to a minimum. Baba’s team did a remarkable job of finding places to shave off weight, such as the rear brake caliper which is 5.3oz lighter than the old model’s. Weighing in at around 430 lbs wet — a full 15 lbs less than the R1 — the 929RR was capable of hitting speeds of over 175 mph.

Though it was only produced for two years before being replaced by the CBR954RR, the 929 did receive a few minor updates, such as a revised ECU for 2001. That same year, Big Red also introduced several new liveries for the 929, including a limited edition Erion Racing version to celebrate the team’s ample competition success. Founded by AMA National titleholder and former racer, Kevin Erion, Erion Racing is an American race team with a whopping 14 AMA National Championships under its belt. The team utilizes Hondas and managed to win four consecutive titles in the Formula Xtreme series from 1997 through 2000 (and then again in 2006 and 2007). The Erion Racing CBR929RR featured a black, white, and red livery borrowed straight from the team’s AMA race bike.

We sold this 929 (VIN: JH2SC44441M100284) to the current owner 10 months ago, however he believes it’s “time for a change” so he’s selling this as well as a RC51 Nicky Hayden.

It is currently located in Cedarburg, Wisconsin and is offered on a clean California title. The odometer shows 10,307 miles.

It has several upgrades, including an Erion exhaust.

Power Commander and SpeedoHealer.

R&G axle and frame sliders, Galfer rotors front/rear, and steel braided brake lines front/rear.

Flush mount front turn signals and mirror block-off plates.

New seat cover.

Aftermarket brake light and a tail tidy.

Also included is a set of CRG RC2 levers still in the packaging and Sato Racing rearsets.


There are a few minor paint imperfections (shown in the photo album up top). One of the aforementioned sliders also sports a minor scuff, though it saved the bodywork.


Of all the 929s, the Erion is the one you want, harkening back to a golden age of American superbike competition. Whether it’s the next addition to your stable, a race-themed display piece, or a regular rider, you’ll be happy with this one.