Additional photos of this YB11 are available here for your perusal.

Bimota’s nomenclature is simple:
Y = Yamaha-powered
B = Bimota-designed
11 = the 11th model with a Yamaha motor.

In this case, the YB11 specifically utilized the 1,002cc inline 4 motor from a YZF1000R (known in some markets as the Thunderace), but the Bimota weighed an impressive 32 pounds less than the Yamaha. That might be why the Italian firm adorned the rear flanks of this machine with “Super Leggera.” Just 600 YB11s were built, 87 of which were originally sold in the United States.

The Yamaha motor was originally good for 145 horsepower, but Bimota’s engineers bumped the number up with a larger airbox, new exhaust, and a carb re-jet. The original MSRP was approximately $30,000, and that bought you revisions to the usual Bimota frame – the main crossmember was relocated towards the steering head and the swingarm pivot point was revised. Paioli supplied the suspension, including gigantic 51mm front forks that were fully adjustable. It’s an odd size, which means that finding rebuild kits can be difficult. Lucky for you, this example (VIN: ZES1YB11XVRZES037) has forks which were recently rebuilt – the seller notes that he got one of the last (if not the very last) seal kit available in Europe – so you can relax for now. You can even relax while on the road, as the YB11 has a much more reasonable riding position than the average Bimota.

When the seller acquired this YB11 in May of 2015, it took him almost two years to get it sorted and back on the road with extensive maintenance that included a new Yamaha water pump, a used replacement radiator with new hoses, new spark plugs, rebuilt carbs with a Dynojet Stage 1 kit, new K&N air filter, new fuel filter, and new fuel pump. The bodywork had some cracks so he had everything but the gas tank/seat cowl restored and repainted. With that said, there are hairline fractures on either side of the front fairing where the mirrors are mounted.

The screw holes in the front cowl and fairings were strengthened with carbon fiber on the insides to prevent further spider cracks. The GPS mount (not unit) shown in some photos is included in the sale, and it is wired so that it receives power when the bike is on and shuts off with ignition.

In addition, the seller replaced the black bodywork screws with stainless steel units from Probolt – all other screws were also replaced with medical grade stainless steel 318 hardware. The bike has an Arrow exhaust, 1 month old battery, billet levers, Spiegler stainless steel braided brake lines, new brake pads, new brake/clutch reservoirs with billet covers, and tires with approximately 1,000 miles on them. This bike currently has 5,109 miles, however the seller rides it every couple of weeks so that number may increase slightly.

Got any YB11 stories/advice, or have any questions? Comment below!